Matches for: “xtr” …

Miltons White Ind T11 hubs and DT Swiss 585 rims

Milton wanted a pair of stiff, durable wheels which wouldn’t break spokes and would bring back his confidence descending.

The DT Swiss 585 rim is a favourite of mine for this type of use as it’s extremely good quality and has a very smooth brake track.

We used White Industries T11 hubs which also work great for larger, more powerful riders.  The titanium freehub body means the cassette cogs won’t dig in and good quality bearings mean minimal maintenance.

DT Swiss Competition spokes and brass nipples hold everything together.  Two spokes at each valve are silver which matches Milton’s name on the rim.

Robs ZTR Race rims and Pro2 hubs

Rob had a pair of uber-light Stan’s Race rims which he wanted built up.  These rims are less than 300 grams each which is extremely light for a mountain bike rim – so light that Stan’s no longer make them.

He’d selected a Hope Pro2 hubset in anodized red so I matched some anodized red spoke nipples.  Custom red decals tie it all together.

We used a combination of DT Swiss Revolution and Competition spokes to keep the weight as low as possible while retaining as much lateral stiffness as possible.

 

Tracy’s Velocity A23 rims and Alchemy ELF / DT Swiss 240s hubs

Tracy wanted a pair of all-around wheels for both training and racing.  A pair of aluminium clinchers with the 23mm wide Velocity A23 rims fit the brief.   The light weight A23 rims allow lower tyre pressure for better grip and cornering.

The front wheel is 20 hole and the rear is 28.  Tracy is very light so we could have gone with a 24 hole rear wheel however the extra 4 spokes will allow a lot of extra long-term durability and still work out at a very light 1439 gram total weight.

All spokes are bladed DT Swiss Aerolites and use black aluminium nipples.  Two red spokes at red Wheelworks decals at each valve will match her bike perfectly.

Scotts Flite clinchers with ELF and White Ind H3 hubs

Scott wanted a pair of race and event wheels for his new Cannondale SuperSix.

The light and aero 45mm Flite carbon rims fit the bill perfectly.  I laced the front wheel with 20 DT Swiss Aerolite spokes to a 66 gram Alchemy ELF hub.

The rear uses 24 of the same Aerolite spokes to a White Industries H3 hub with a titanium 11 speed freehub body.  This is one of the last H3 hubs I’ll be building as it’s been superseded by the T11 which is identical in spec and performance but visually different.  These hubs work exceptionally well for larger and more powerful riders who need a little extra rear wheel stiffness.

Two white spokes at each valve and custom white decals make the wheels look great.  We used a script font on these wheels at Scott’s request.

1433 gram actual weight is great.

Craig’s XT hubs and Mavic A719 touring wheels

These 36 hole touring wheels are for Craig.

The A719 is Mavic’s top of the range touring rim and features double-eyelets and a extremely good quality brake track.

These rims are laced to XT 756 hubs – probably the best of Shimano’s hub offerings for touring as they use a simple cup-and-cone design and steel axles.

Spokes are DT Swiss Competition with brass nipples, and both wheels are laced 36 3-cross.

Mat Waghorn’s Enve ride report

After re-building Mat’s Tune hubs with some new Enve tubeless XC rims Mat went on to give them a good thrashing.  Here is his writeup after a few rides:

http://mathewwaghorn.webs.com/apps/blog/show/15060990-my-new-bling-enve-composite-rims

Just before the T42 race, I received a nice upgrade to my race bike. My old rims were getting buckled and dented, as light weight rims do with age. Tristan, from Wheelworks informed me that it would a good idea to replace them before I went overseas, as they may not be able to last the entire trip. For a while I was thinking about another set of Notubes rims, but I would eventually have to replace them again. Tristan then suggested I look at the Enve Carbon rims. After a few emails and some thought consolidation I decided to go for them. They weigh about 30g per Rim heavier than my old rims, but they easily make up for this unnoticeable weight difference with their control and the peace of mind you acquire from them. I have got the the T42 race, a club race, and the 24 hour Moonride under my belt on these rims as well as a training session to get used to them and find for myself the performance benefits received. As soon as I hit the first corner of my first ride I could feel the difference. These Rims are extremely stiff. They handle like a dream; you point the wheel in a certain direction and you WILL go there (traction permitting). The tracks at Santoft are some of the more twisty and tight tracks that I ride. At the club race there I was loving it. Flying around corners and being able to trust my wheels 100% to do their job. I see these wheels as a Hybrid between my Crossmax SLR wheelset and my Notubes wheelset. Stiffer than my Crossmax with weight of my Notubes. It’s great to be able to have the peace of mind that these rims offer. They have just bumped up their warranty to 5 years. That is some serious confidence in their product, and therefore some serious confidence for their customers. They say “The ENVE XC rim is made for cross country racers and trail riders alike, and is only limited by the amount of time you have to ride them”. That sounds good to me! I have been running them with my 2.2 continental tires, and the combination makes for such an incredible ride. The extra absorption from the tires, plus the dampening effects of the carbon rims make it extraordinarily smooth. I really feel that the balance in this wheelset between light weight and handling is perfect. They have tremendous control around each corner and still great acceleration and speed. And to top it all off, they look great. The slightly deeper rims with my fat 2.2 tires make them look extremely meaty and fast. Just the look they deserve, and live up to. On top of that, the decals are done with perfection. An awesome Logo by Enve and the ever impressive wheelworks decals, customized with my name. Perfection.

  

If you are currently looking for a great upgrade to your bike then go no further than these rims. I couldn’t rate them any higher; 5 stars from me.

HUGE thanks to Wide Open (the distributors of ENVE) and Tristan from Wheelworks for sorting these wheels out for me. I rate Tristan’s wheel builds very highly; he’s your man if you need to know anything about wheels, or if you need a set built or maintained. Feel free to contact him, a link to his website is on my sponsors page.

James’ Pro2 rear hub and Flow 29er rim

James needed a new rear wheel for his Gary Fisher after breaking spokes after almost every ride.

A strong rim was in order and the Stan’s Flow is perfect.  These are a wide, stiff rim which build up really well and will work with a wide range of tyre widths.

I used the awesome Pro2 rear hub as it stands up extremely well to larger riders, and all the small-parts for servicing are easy and affordable to get.

DT Swiss Competition spokes and brass nipples tie everything together and will keep the wheel running true and broken-spoke-free for many years to come.

James sent me his old hub with cassette and rotor still attached so I fitted these to the new wheel and it’s on it’s way back to Rotoura.

I stand behind my work 100% and guarantee no broken spokes for 3 years (barring any big hits or crashes of course) so if you’re a larger fella and you want your wheel problems to go away give me a call.

Paddy’s DT Swiss 240s hubs and Open Pro training wheels

Paddy was looking for a pair of year-round training wheels which would stand up to bad roads and inclement weather.

I suggested the DT Swiss 240s hubs as they’re the lowest-maintenance hubset I’ve come across and they’re a great center for a wheelset.

Paddy wanted a high spoke count,’traditional’ wheelset, so we used the Mavic Open Pro rims. No rim lasts forever, especially with the extra wear and tear of wet-weather braking so the Open Pros were chosen for their affordability and ease of replacement in the future.

I used DT Swiss Competition spokes. The front spoke nipples are aluminium to save weight, and the rear are black brass.  The front wheel uses 28 spokes which are laced two-cross, and the rear uses 32 spokes laced three-cross on both sides.

These are a great-looking pair of wheels which should last a loooong time.

Black jerseys and bad timing

Months ago the idea of a black jersey was mentioned at a team meeting and the gears started turning.  We were very conscious of not having a jersey which looked like the awesome PureBlack kit.

All of the Wheelworks Racing guys and gals are huge PureBlack fans.  To hear the news that they weren’t able to secure funding for next year’s European campaign is extremely sad. Hopefully this is just a temporary stumbling block for them.

It sucks for everyone:  For the riders, especially guys like the uber talented young fellas James Oram and Michael Torckler, it’s too late for them to find another international team for 2012.  For Avanti who need to prove they have a top-tier bike as they enter foreign markets.  For New Zealand cycling which looses an inspirational, groundbreaking, iconic team.  For NZ corporates who missed the opportunity to showcase their brands to the world on the jersey of a bunch of top kiwi blokes.

These black Wheelworks jerseys are our tongue-in-cheek way of showing our respect for the PureBlack boys.

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Jeremy Colnago Record hubs and TB14 rims

Right from the get-go this was a cool project: take a pair of old Campag Record hubs with Colnago patographing, convert them to fit a 126mm-spaced Colnago Master, and build some wheels around them.

In the box: two hubs, an axle, a bunch of bearings, a 7 speed freewheel, and an 8 speed freewheel. Yep – freewheel. Pre-cassette.

 

First I fitted the new, longer axle, and mocked-up the spacing. I left a 1.5mm overhang on the driveside.

Then the fun starts. After a few notes, a couple of measurements, and bit of math it’s time to make chips.

 

With the new spacer made I can adjust the hub bearings. When correctly adjust an open-bearing hub will have a slight amount of play before the quick release is clamped – the force of the QR actually compresses the axle and removes this play. Wheelbuilding with a loose hub is a pain and makes it very hard to hit the tenth of a millimter targets I build to so at this point the hub is adjusted to be too tight.

With the hub in one piece I can measure the flange offsets and calculate the spoke lengths are per normal.